Stifled by the salary cap

Napisz kim jesteś, skąd jesteś i co Cię do nas sprowadza. Dobrze Cię widzieć!
liny195
Posty: 24
Rejestracja: 03 lis 2018, 8:34

Stifled by the salary cap

Postautor: liny195 » 28 gru 2018, 7:34

[url=http://www.buccaneerscheapshops.com]www.buccaneerscheapshops.com[/url] , the Atlanta Falcons won't be offering Julio Jones a more lucrative contract.Not this year, at least.Now the question is: Will the star receiver show up for training camp?The Falcons informed Jones several weeks ago that they would not renegotiate his current $71.5 million package, which still has three years remaining and included $47 million in guaranteed money, according to a person familiar with the discussions. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity Thursday because the talks have not been made public.The team's decision, which was first reported by The Athletic, does not preclude talks after the season on a deal more in line with Jones' status as one of the NFL's top receivers. But the Falcons do not believe they have enough financial leeway under the cap to renegotiate the contract in 2018.The team hasn't been told if Jones will be at training camp. Players are required to report next Thursday, with the first practice the following day.Atlanta already agreed to a five-year, $150 million extension with quarterback Matt Ryan, the most lucrative deal in NFL history. The team is also focused on working out new contracts for defensive tackle Grady Jarrett, offensive guard Jake Matthews and safety Ricardo Allen.A flurry of new contracts during the offseason dropped Jones, who makes an average salary of $14.25 million, out of the top half-dozen on the list of the league's highest-paid receivers. Tampa Bay's Mike Evans, Cleveland's Jarvis Landry and Kansas City's Sammy Watkins are among those now making more per year than Jones, a two-time All-Pro who caught 88 passes for 1,444 yards last season.In 2015, Jones turned in one of the greatest seasons by a receiver with 136 receptions for 1,871 yards and eight touchdowns. He is a five-time Pro Bowler.In an apparent sign of his unhappiness, Jones skipped organized team workouts at the team's training facility this summer, as well as a mandatory minicamp. But he apparently took part in Ryan's private passing camp in California along with about a dozen of his teammates this month.Jones has gone silent on social media and hasn't talked with the Atlanta media in months. In one of his rare media appearances, he told TMZ that he has a good relationship with the franchise that pulled off a huge trade with Cleveland to make him a first-round pick in 2011."Everyone wants a story right now. There's no story to be told [url=http://www.buccaneerscheapshops.com/cheap-authentic-t-shirts]Tampa Bay Buccaneers T-Shirt[/url] ," Jones insisted. "I'm just working on getting myself better. I'm just working on myself right now. That's all that is. There's no bad blood between me and the team or anything like that."Jones remains in the good graces of coach Dan Quinn, who didn't seem at all upset when Jones skipped the minicamp ."Sometimes football and business intersect," Quinn said. "That's OK and that happens a lot."Quinn has talked constantly of "brotherhood" and making sure players do everything as a team. For instance, the players stood together as a team on the sideline during the national anthem for all games after two players kneeled in protest early in the 2017 season.Quinn doesn't think Jones' absence has affected the Falcons' unity."Do we want everybody here all the time? Hell yeah, like all the time," the coach said. "What I'd say is if you ask to a man, the guy is a hell of a teammate, and the time he spends here, the way he mentors people, how hard he plays, there is plenty of brotherhood in Julio." They're not comparable to Power Five players, or even guys from the MAC, AAC or Mountain West. At least not on the football field.In the classroom? That's no contest.Work in such subjects as nuclear physics, applied and computational mathematics, or geological engineering help Ivy Leaguers stand out in the real world. For NFL personnel people, such a resume is impressive — yet means a lot less than how fast a player ran the 40, how many squats he can do, or his injury history.That doesn't mean the eight Ivy League schools who play in FCS — and don't go to bowl games — get ignored by the pros. Indeed, there were 16 Ivies in the NFL last season, six starters. Two more were selected last weekend: Penn receiver Justin Watson in the fifth round by the Buccaneers [url=http://www.buccaneerscheapshops.com/cheap-authentic-hats]Tampa Bay Buccaneers Hats[/url] , and Yale safety/linebacker Foye Oluokun in the sixth by the Falcons. A few others have been signed as undrafted free agents.Among the dozen 2017 pros were Tampa Bay tight end Cameron Brate of Harvard and New England fullback James Develin of Brown. Brate had 48 receptions for a 12.3-yard average and six touchdowns as one of Jameis Winston's favorite targets with the Bucs. Develin merely has won two Super Bowls and made the Pro Bowl last season, as did 49ers fullback Kyle Juszczyk , who attended Harvard."It takes an incredibly driven and dedicated individual to excel at the highest levels of academia and athletic competition," says Robin Harris, executive director of the Ivy League. "The Ivy League's unique approach allows our student-athletes to focus on reaching their fullest potential in both realms and prepares them for lifelong success, whether in their field of study or professional athletic opportunities."Oluokun hopes to seize his opportunity as a linebacker in Atlanta, though he's versatile enough to handle safety duties. At 6-1, 234, he's got the size, and can handle pass coverage.Then again, when you can juggle a course load filled with the likes of macroeconomics, econometrics and European economic history, you probably can breeze through a playbook."I believe 100 percent it prepares you," Oluokun says of the schoolwork at Yale and the challenges of making the NFL. "You have got to put in that work and there are really no shortcuts here, and if you get behind you need to catch up, and that's not easy. So if you make that mistake, you learn from it."At first thought I thought it might be stressful," he adds of being a student-athlete in the Ivy League, "but it really is manageable if you approach it the right way. You have teachers who will help you out and you have tutors if you need them, or other students are kind of helping you out because they are in the same situation."Except that the great majority of football players from Yale [url=http://www.buccaneerscheapshops.com/cheap-authentic-hoodie]Tampa Bay Buccaneers Hoodie[/url] , Penn, Columbia, Harvard, Brown, Princeton, Dartmouth and Cornell are not heading to the NFL. Still, the true standouts get drafted, going back to 1949, when Penn's two-way lineman Chuck Bednarik went first overall to Philadelphia. All Bednarik eventually did was make the Pro Football Hall of Fame.Ivies in the league last season were Brate; Develin; Juszczyk; Giants tight end Ryan O'Malley (Penn); Colts center Anthony Fabiano (Harvard); Giants long snapper Zak DeOssie (Brown); Browns center J.C. Tretter (Cornell); Seahawks long snapper Tyler Ott (Harvard); Browns tight end Seth DeValve (Princeton); Colts defensive tackle Caraun Reid (Princeton); Panthers center Greg Van Roten (Penn); Jets linebacker Josh Martin (Columbia); Buccaneers quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick (Harvard); Bills center Adam Redmond (Harvard); Bears tight end Ben Braunecker (Harvard); and Vikings guard Nick Easton (Harvard).Two current head coaches, Dallas' Jason Garrett (Princeton) and Houston's Bill O'Brien (Brown) also are Ivy guys."The NFL is incredibly challenging for all players, especially rookies that have to make a big adjustment playing against professionals," says Princeton coach Bob Surace. "I have been impressed by the talent level of the athletes in the Ivy League. More high school football players have turned down Power Five schools recently as they realize they can reach their athletic dreams and long-term career goals better in the Ivy League than any other conference."As important, we are having more players make NFL teams better because our players love to compete, they have outstanding work habits and a burning desire to achieve at the highest level in everything they do."Including, given the chance, in the NFL.

Wróć do „Przedstaw się”

Kto jest online

Użytkownicy przeglądający to forum: Obecnie na forum nie ma żadnego zarejestrowanego użytkownika i 0 gości